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Table 1 Various display technologies

From: Biomolecular engineering for nanobio/bionanotechnology

Technology (typical number of sequences screened per library) Description Strengths or weaknesses
Bacterial cell display (108–109) Fusion gene libraries of the target proteins and bacterial surface proteins
Fusion proteins are displayed on bacterial cell surface
Selects proteins displayed on bacterial cell surfaces
Flow cytometry allows multiparameter, quantitative screening
Smaller library size
Cannot screen proteins that would be toxic to cells
Yeast or mammalian cell display (108–1010) Fusion gene libraries of the target protein and cell surface proteins of yeast or mammalian cells
Fusion proteins are displayed on cell surface
Selects proteins displayed on eukaryotic cell surfaces
Flow cytometry allows multiparameter, quantitative screening
Smaller library sizes
Cannot screen proteins that would be toxic to cells
Phage or baculovirus display (1011) Fusion gene libraries of the target protein and phage or virus coat proteins
Infected bacteria produces phage or virus particles displaying fusion protein libraries on the surface
Robust and quick
Cannot screen proteins that would be toxic to cells
Ribosome display (1015) mRNA-target protein complexes are displayed on stalled ribosomes in cell free protein synthesis system
Reverse-transcription PCR allows amplification after rounds of selections
Large library size
Can screen proteins that would be toxic to cells
Requires stringent conditions and stable proteins
mRNA display (1015) mRNA-target protein fusions are synthesized in cell free protein synthesis system by conjugating them through a puromycin linker
Reverse-transcription PCR allows amplification after rounds of selections
Large library size
Can screen proteins that would be toxic to cells
Works well with small proteins but not large ones
Requires stringent conditions